PG and the Art of Collective Mythmaking VI

It’s that time again! The Ides of March were upon us when PG Cafe and Gallery opened their awesome annual group myth-themed show. Our work will hang until April 20 and there’s some awesome stuff there this year. I’ll try to do a posting of a few different pieces if I get the chance, but admittedly March is one of my more insane months so we’ll see. Possibly closer to show closing to remind people to get out there!

In the meantime, here’s the piece I have in the show. Some lucky person has already claimed the first 16×20 archival canvas of “The Return of Cortes Quetzalcoatl,” but I’ll try to have smaller prints in time for Spring YART. Continue reading

PG & The Art of Collective Mythmaking IV

I’m honored to be back for the fourth round of this amazing annual group show at PG Cafe and Gallery! The show runs for the rest of this week and then I think they’re taking it down this Thursday, April 14. So if you haven’t seen it yet, run on down to PG ¬†at 1418 W. Franklin and see this amazing show!!

Here’s some (but not all) of the fantastic art in this show, with the last 2 pieces being my contributions. If you wanna see the rest, you’ll have to go!

Just for fun, here’s the show opening flyer and a couple of shots of the PG chalkboard the day I went and snapped these pictures.

PG-Eville-Flyer-Mythmaking-2016

A look back at…Amy Wilke’s Still Lives: Wunderkabinett

Amy Wilke has been known in the past for her wonderful cut-paper works, but more and more recently she has been letting us see her equally marvelous talent for clean, hyper-detailed ink drawings. Paired with her whimsical and macabre subject matter, her rich and delicate linework will have you staring raptly at each piece for minutes upon hours. There’s always more to discover. But don’t take my word for it, have a look at these pieces from her “Still Lives: Wunderkabinett” show.

I was reminded of this amazing show a few days ago when I saw one of Amy’s pieces over at a friend’s house. The show actually took place last year, but since 2014 was a very busy freelance year for me I haven’t been able to document it properly until now.

When I first saw the show I was immediately reminded of the concept of studiolo, something a former art history prof of mine told me about long ago. The studiolo (or “study”) was a special room that was richly appointed with interesting and mysterious paintings, myriad books, curiosities, tools of science and writing, and objects d’art. The room’s function was to serve as a place for a learned man to sit musing or contemplating deep and interesting things. He would turn over the room’s curiosities in his hands, examine a book or skull or sculpture, and perhaps come away with a new understanding of some minute aspect of our universe.

It came as no suprise when I went to find the meaning of “Wunderkabinett” that it was basically the German counterpart of the Italian studiolo, a “cabinet of wonders” that contained strange and interesting objects that invited the owner to handle and contemplate them in quiet moments.

The insects, skulls and other curiosities in these delicate and exacting drawings bring to mind that same appreciation and worship of the natural world, while at the same time underlining how beautifully disturbing and uncanny it can really be. Every cell and and scale is lovingly imagined, giving almost infinite facets to these gems. I think these particular pieces might all be sold by now, but you are always welcome to check out Amy at Paper Raven Art + Design and see what she has brewing now…or even better, commission something of your very own.

amy wilke still lives wunderkabinett playbill

Memento Mori

in the tradition of the medieval still life with a skull mixed in as a reminder of mortality

Now to go back to a very old piece indeed, this conceptual still life from 2006 or so! My only goal here was to do my own version of the kinds of medieval and renaissance still-life paintings I remember seeing where various objects like books, globes or dead fish would be interspersed with a human skull as a reminder of mortality. If memory serves these were called “memento mori.” But it’s been awhile since I was in school, admittedly.

I was also interested in what was described to me as the “archaic smile” that was normally found on ancient Greek sculptures of girls and boys (Kore and Koros, I think). These beautiful young people wore enigmatic smiles as free-standing sculptures or pillars, supposedly because it made their faces look like they wore the proper serene expression when being viewed from below. I’m wracking my memory here, but I believe that’s what I was thinking when including the bust of the young man.

Memento Mori is on Society6||Redbubble. Among other things I made some depressing stationary you can use to remind people of mortality.

a skull superimposed on a cracked eggshell turned into a piece of unique stationary for the goth in us all.
Oh no!!