The basics of setting up Patreon from a clueless comic Creator

Sandpaperdaisy Art on patreon

As of early this morning, I have a Patreon page! It was all unfamiliar to me, so I’ll share what I learned while setting up.

Keep in mind, I just learned about Patreon yesterday. I’d seen it once or twice before but I didn’t understand the mechanics. Well, I stayed up all night until my eyes bled, reading over everything and carefully combing through other creator pages. Here’s what I gleaned:

      A Creator sets up a system where supporters (Patrons) can pay them for the work they release.

Creators can get paid by the creation (in my case, per comic page) or monthly, if they make several creations a month.

By-Creation Pledges:

        Patrons can select a pledge option, like “$1 per comic page.” Then, if a Creator releases a new comic page and marks it as a “paid” work, the patron will be billed their $1 at the first of the month, or $3 if the Creator made 3 pages within that month, and so on. If the Creator made no “paid” work, Patrons are charged nothing for that month.

Monthly Pledges: If a Patron has pledged “$1 per month,” they will be charged $1, once a month, and so on with other amounts.

A Patron can select a monthly cap on pledges, so if a Creator releases 10 comic pages in one month but the Patron has a cap of $5 per month, they are only charged $5.

A Patron can cancel their pledge at any time before the first of the month and they will not be charged for that month. (Patreon states they are only interested in collecting pledges from people who actually want to support the artist, so no one is under any obligation to fulfill their pledge.)

A Creator can release a piece of work as “free” and everyone can see and enjoy it without paying any pledges.

Lastly, a Creator can also be a Patron, and pledge to support other Creators.

[Admittedly, I have not even tried to go into the fine points of payment, account setup, and so on, but I was able to figure everything out from Patreon’s FAQ. They can explain it better than I can!]

So, after I read all that stuff, I decided it seemed pretty reasonable, at least worth a try. I had considered Kickstarter before, but there were some things that I didn’t like about the model. Mainly, I was wary that so much depended on getting people to pledge money and make good on their payments. Artists using a Kickstarter understandably have to be pushing for it constantly or they could be in real financial trouble! They might also find themselves obligated to fulfill rewards that they have no way of realistically meeting.

With this system, people can give you a small amount of money one time, they can set a cap, or they can cancel before paying you at all. I prefer that as someone who has to pinch pennies myself. Better, they’re not paying you for a huge project you may or may not even be able to accomplish. They are only paying you for the work you have really done, and they are only paying you in order to give you some support. You can certainly give them rewards for this, but you aren’t contractually obligated to complete some huge, grand endeavor.

You may notice that I didn’t include my art projects or simple illustrations in the creations I chose to be paid for. I made it solely for comics since I am already being paid for all the exhibition and freelance/commission pieces I make. (I know, when in my wildest dreams did I ever think I would say THAT.)

But anyway, since comics is the only thing I still do without any expectation of payment, I realize that it often has to take a backseat to my other art projects. “Well, that’s kind of a shame” I thought, so I’ve made this page in order to get support as I muddle my way through my currently unpaid comic projects. Anything I do normally get paid for (my personal art projects, freelance work, etc) will not go on Patreon as a “paid” work but you will probably get to see it as my friend looking at my feed!

Do you have a Patreon Creator or Patron page? Please feel free to share it, I’d love to find some new friends. If you’ve had any experiences with Patreon, bad or good, I’d love to hear about those too.

https://www.patreon.com/sandpaperdaisy

And after you set up your patreon page, head over to The Muse’s Library for this fabulous tutorial on how to run your page, including tips on scheduling and reward fulfillment, and even templates for patreon share buttons and banners!

Press Release for The killing of Dreams

More Tools: Press Kit || Media Kit || Blogger Kit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: 05/05/2014

Contact: Heather Landry, sandpaperdaisy@gmail.com

Local artist publishes horror/dark fantasy comic, “the killing of dreams.”

Heather Landry’s 42-page comic one-shot explores forbidden love and coming-of-age themes as well.

Evansville, IN – Award-winning artist Heather Landry is extremely active in the local art scene, recently helping to organize the wildly successful 2nd annual Franklin Street Earth Day Art Crawl. Her work has been featured in numerous local shows and galleries including the Bower-Suhrheinrich Foundation Gallery and a solo show at PG Gallery and Cafe, and her light-hearted autobiographical comic “Things Fall Apart” appeared in the local entertainment magazine News4U from 2004-2008. An active member of the Arts Council of Doom, a local counter-culture art movement, Landry is exploring darker themes with The killing of Dreams.

“Most of my artwork is based on my own dreams and this comic is no exception,” says Landry, who goes by Sandpaperdaisy online. “The killing of Dreams began with a nightmare I woke up from one morning in 2006. Now almost a decade later, I’ve finally been able to realize my dream in concrete form and offer it to others.”
The comic preserves its nightmarish feeling through the use of limited colors and heavy shadows, a stylized “painterly” approach and a closed-set feel leaving the reader feeling uneasily trapped with the disturbing events unfolding before their eyes. The story centers around two girls, Claire and Else, who find their tenuous relationship threatened by deadly forces beyond their comprehension.

Landry is new to publishing and her humorous article “Everything I did wrong when I tried to make a digital comic file” offers an unblushing perspective–as well as helpful pointers–to anyone interested in the rigors of self-publishing in the digital age. This article as well as information on her new book and all her other shows and projects can be seen at http://sandpaperdaisy.com. Right now Landry is finishing a new project to debut at Cincy Comicon, coming up this September 5-7. After that she will be working on several new comic projects including Dog Street, a compilation thematically centered around childhood and the horrifying and nonsensical wonderland associated with it. Her published comic short The Ruby Machine will appear in this compilation and is available to read online.

You can also find Landry on Twitter as @sandpaperdaisy and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SandpaperdaisyArt

Her new book “The killing of Dreams” is available on Amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K1WBM3Q and is available in print from IndyPlanet here: http://www.indyplanet.com/front/?product=109508

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